Luna Station Quarterly is a speculative fiction magazine featuring stories by emerging women authors.
Now in our 8th year!

Issue 032 is LIVE! Meet our cover artist: Miranda Meeks

by Anna O’Brien

“December” for Issue 032 by Miranda Meeks

Luna Station Quarterly is happy to announce that Issue 032 is now available! Grab a copy and dive into nine amazing stories by female-identifying writers that push the boundaries of speculative fiction, sci-fi, and fantasy. We have trolls, we have specters, we have the future of medical science, we have our first translated work (!), AND we have gorgeous cover art. In fact, we quite recently chatted with our cover artist, Miranda Meeks. Read more for what Miranda has to say about her art, creativity, and inspiration.

LSQ: Where do you get your beautiful, haunting ideas? What inspires your art?

Miranda: A lot of my ideas are inspired by various things, from photography, movies, music, classical paintings, etc. I’m especially inspired by images that tell a narrative or a story, without leaving too many clues as to what that story could be. I love hearing different interpretations of my paintings, which is part of the reason that ambiguity really resonates with me.

LSQ: Can you tell us a bit about your methods? How long does it take to complete a piece? What media do you most commonly use?

“Poe Sister” by Miranda Meeks

Miranda: Most of my pieces are digital, and they take anywhere from 15-50 hours, depending on the project, subject matter, etc. I’ve been fortunate to be able to experiment with oils these past few years as well, which has been really fun.

LSQ: There is a lot of animal imagery mixed into many of your pieces–snakes, wolves, a lamb… Can you tell us about why you’ve picked these animals?

Miranda: I really like certain animals and subject matter because they aren’t so exotic that I’ve never seen them before in person, or only at a zoo. I also enjoy drawing animals that have a lot of symbolism tied into their identities. When you draw a wolf, almost everyone has these pre-built ideas and biases associated with that wolf, so you’re able to convey mood and ideas without having to literally draw them out. Besides all those things, certain animals are simply a lot of fun to draw and paint.

LSQ: Regarding your cover for Issue 032, “December,” — can you tell us the story behind it? Who is that girl? Where is she? What’s happening or going to happen? Or do you know?

Miranda: For the “December” piece, I wanted to convey the idea that the girl is comfortable and strong, despite the snake wrapped around her neck and in her hair. I don’t know who she is or where she is, but I like to imply strength in the women I draw, despite their circumstances.

LSQ: Tell us a bit about your journey as an artist — did you anticipate being where you are today?

Miranda: When I first went to college I thought I wanted to be a children’s book illustrator. That changed to wanting to go into editorial. Then a year or two after graduating, everything gradually shifted to doing book covers, which I am very happy with. I would not have guessed it 5-10 years ago, but I am so glad to be where I’m at now.

LSQ: What feelings do you want to invoke in us as we look at your work? What messages are you sending?

“What Lies Beneath” by Miranda Meeks

Miranda: I love the idea of bridging the gap between beauty and darkness. I hope to convey to my audience that there is beauty in those things that might be haunting or surreal.

LSQ: Where do you hope to see your art over the next five to ten years, both figuratively and literally?

Miranda: I hope to be able to improve my craft and continue to incorporate more traditional pieces into my portfolio. I hope I’m able to make series of pieces that really resonate and connect with people.

LSQ: Is there anything you’d like to tell budding artists? Words of wisdom?

Miranda: To artists who are just starting out, my advice would be to keep going, no matter what life throws at you. It’s been really difficult balancing family life with work life as I stay home with my two little kids, and although it feels impossible to get that balance right, it’s also fulfilling to be able to do both. It is somehow possible, if you just stick with it.

A bit about the columnist:

Anna is a writer and veterinarian currently living in central Maryland. Visit author page