Luna Station Quarterly is a speculative fiction magazine featuring stories by emerging women authors.
Now in our 8th year!

Editorial, Issue 001

Women, girls, science fiction, epic fantasy. These words don’t always go together well, and I’m looking to change that. In short, that is why I started Luna Station Quarterly. The longer version of why is a little more wordy.

I’ve often found myself the only girl in the comic book store, the only female in the sci-fi/fantasy section of the bookstore. I often wonder why that is, but I also wonder what needs to happen to change it.

Are women less likely to be readers? Then how can we get them reading more?

Are the characters and situations in genre fiction simply not appealing to the majority of women? Where exactly is that breakdown occurring?

Is this a situation set in stone, or does it simple need to be challenged? Did sci-fi/fantasy start out as a boys’ club, or did it evolve that way?

Is there anything inherently wrong with the status quo, is change even required?

To this last question, I say yes. Why? Because despite women’s liberation we still live in a world where the glass ceiling is a reality. While encompassing a majority of the population, women are still considered second class in ways that are so subtle and entrenched in our society that we cannot even see it.

For myself, I like to think things aren’t too bad, but then I grew up in the seventies and eighties, a post-feminist I suppose, and played with Tonka trucks and Batmoblies from a young age. I have always been told that girls can do anything we want, yet in everyday life, I see examples of girls being prevented from achieving their dreams.

Now, I don’t set out to be a political activist, but much like my vegetarianism, I hope to lead by example. By providing a forum for women author’s to display their work, their dreams, I hope to help facilitate change.

This thinking forms the first of two reasons why I started this magazine. The second reason is much more simple: I love stories and I love genre fiction.

Anything can happen in a story, wild dreams, leaps of faith, vivid nightmares, whole societies rise and then fall, all in the space of a few hundred, a few thousand words. Amazing, and such a unique gift authors have to share these visions with the world.

Genre fiction, in particular, can do extraordinary things. When grounded to a solid character or idea, the lessons of the ages can be passed from author to reader. Profound experiences are shared in the deepest ways, in the poetry of words, the exploration of the mind, and the opening of the heart.

And that is the kind of story I hope to share with you. A little action and adventure, a few surprises, twists, and turns, wouldn’t be too bad either, and you’ll find those within these pages as well.

I do hope you enjoy the stories we’re presenting this first issue. Each of the ladies within have contributed something special and all their own. I’m so thrilled to be able to share them with you.

And please do feel free to contact us and let us know what you think. You may also contact many of our authors through their profile pages.

Please, go and enjoy the stories, and pass on the link to our site or the printable pdf to anyone you think might enjoy it. I do not take any advertising and, as yet, no one is paid, so it’s the best way you can support the site and our authors.

Thank you,
Jennifer Parsons, editor

A bit about the author:

A pixel-slinger and code monkey by trade, Jennifer Lyn Parsons is a life-long lover of story with a capital S. Her work has been seen in 365 Tomorrows, Dark Valentine Magazine, and Eternal Haunted Summer, among others. She published her first novel in 2012. When not writing either code or fiction, she runs Luna Station Press, reads books as part of the Geek Girls Book Club, devours comic books because she’s loved Batman her entire life, and sometimes makes things out of yarn. She can be reached through her website, pixelpaperyarn.com. Visit author page